An Overview Of SSL Changes – What It Means For Your Website

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An Overview Of SSL Changes – What It Means For Your Website

In today’s ever-changing digital world, it’s imperative that companies keep up to date with Google’s best practices to make sure that they continue to be competitive in their respective online markets. With Google being the most commanding and influential company online, it’s vital for them to keep abreast of all the threats and opportunities that the internet generates. For that reason, Google releases an assortment of updates annually: new features, bug fixes, and the majority associated with the very secretive Google search ranking algorithm.

What is necessary though, is that all online companies that use Google-related services (pretty much every online business), are aware of considerable changes that may have an effect on their SEO, performance, and ultimately their bottom-line. The internet is in a continuous state of change, so online providers need to be flexible and conform with new Google updates as quickly as possible to make certain they aren’t negatively influenced by these new releases.

The most important Google update that has recently had an effect on online providers pertains to Google Chrome v62, which was released in October this year. The Google Chrome web browser is used by almost 50% of all online users, so it’s incredibly important that online companies incorporate the specific changes as quickly as possible if they wish to avoid any negative consequences.

What has changed in Google Chrome v62?

In the Google Chrome v62 update, Google has altered the way in which it marks non-secured (HTTP) pages. If a non-secured (HTTP) page stores passwords and bank card information (which is saved in a plain text file), they are prone to phishing sites that can essentially steal this information from users that wrongly believe they are giving their personal information to a legit business. The Google Chrome browser will start marking any text input field and web address bar as ‘NOT SECURE’ for HTTP pages.

This change will visibly bear upon millions of websites all around the world. Before the change, many non-secured websites weren’t impacted by phishing attacks simply because they didn’t have a public-facing member login, and chose PayPal or other offsite payment processors to accept online payments. Now, however, all websites will need to start securing their web pages given that users will become worried of succumbing to malicious attacks if they insert their personal information into fields marked boldly as ‘NOT SECURE’.

How to make web pages secure?

For online businesses that would like to secure their previously non-secured (HTTP) web pages, they have to encrypt the information being exchanged between their visitors and their web server by incorporating an SSL certificate. Google are clearly pushing for a more secure internet than ever before, and they’ve selected SSL encryption as a vehicle to do this. For website owners who would like to enable HTTPS on their web servers, here is a handy guide: https://developers.google.com/web/fundamentals/security/encrypt-in-transit/enable-https?hl=en. The following link is an additional guide on how you can avoid the ‘NOT SECURE’ warning in Google Chrome which is targeted at web developers: https://developers.google.com/web/updates/2016/10/avoid-not-secure-warn.

What this means for online businesses?

The recent Google update suggests that HTTPS and SSL encryption will become the norm across all web pages on the web. In time, each online firm will have to secure their web pages using SSL encryption whether they like it or not, or users will simply select a competitor that does.

What this also suggests is that not all websites using SSL encryption should be trusted, and there will be a notable increase in phishing sites using HTTPS also. Phishing sites can simply use fake SSL certificates to circumvent the ‘NOT SECURE’ warning by Google Chrome and make their websites appear legitimate. This will make the differentiation between phishing sites and real websites more difficult than ever. Online firms that use an Extended Validation Certificate (EV SSL) will be the most trusted websites on the web due to the fact that it will be exceptionally difficult for phishing sites to mimic the authenticity that EV SSL provides.

Making all websites employ SSL certificates to demonstrate their authenticity will only increase the amount of phishing sites that do the same. At the end of the day, however, SSL encryption will gradually become compulsory, so if you need any support in securing your website with SSL encryption, get in contact with the digital specialists at Internet Marketing Experts Cairns by phoning 1300 595 013, or visit their website for further information: http://www.internetmarketingexpertscairns.com.au

 

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